Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Now where did I see that recipe, it's just what I need!

Wow! There is a recipe for everything. I mean everything. I've found so many that I loved! And I've lost so many that I loved! In 1982 I started a book. We called it the little green book and when I had a recipe I loved I wrote down where it was. Maybe a magazine, a cook book, a newspaper clipping. I have dozens of cook books! Soon I could go to this book to not only find the location of a favorite but to remind myself of what they were. This helps menu planning a great deal.
Today this is so much easier than a little green book. You have Excel and lots of software for recipe saving. If you want to set up an Excel program for tracking I can help you with that.
Maybe you'd like to scan those recipes and keep them close at hand. That's a great idea with how fast we can do things now. I remember having to type recipes I wanted to save and that rarely happened. A couple of my daughters have started notebooks of main dishes and sides and all the stuff you need for a meal. That is a handy way to do recipes. What are you using? Nothing? Well this is key to doing that meal planning for the next 30 years or what ever. Start a plan and I will add more and more to help you in the next blog. I also have an April fools surprise that's not for fools. Watch for the details in up coming blogs

6 comments:

Christine said...

Any suggestions for high altitude cooking? Specifically brownies, mine keep turning out awful.

Fonnell said...

So tell me what is happening to your brownies? Are you cooking them in a glass pan? Yes there are things that change at a high altitude. Water boils later than at sea level. amazing isn't it.

do tell me what is happening to those brownies!

Christine said...

Ok, so the brownies from the box were all gooey, not under done, just really moist. The ones from scratch I've had 2 different things happen. The first time it spilled over the sides of the pan as it was baking. The second time the liquid and dry ingredients seperated as I was stirring (before I added the flour). When I baked them they came out not tasting sweet, just bitter from the unsweetened chocolate. They were too moist, as well. I used to make them in WA all the time and they turned out great every time,and I'm not doing anything different here. Thanks for your help!

Fonnell said...

I found this at the farm extension site for a mountain location in collorado. Try these ideas and the problem all goes back to the degree water boils at. It affects all items with any moisture. Hope this will help and we will keep at it because it will keep on giving you problems as you try your recipes.


decreasing sugar by about 1 tablespoon for every 2000 feet of elevation.
-increasing liquid by about 1 tablespoon for every 2000 feet of elevation.
-increasing cake flour by about1 tablespoon for every 2000 feet of elevation starting after 2000 feet.
-increasing the baking temperature about 3 degrees farenheit for every 1000 feet of elevation.
-reducing the leavening agent by about one-fourth of the original measurement for every 2000 feet of elevation.
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Fonnell said...

http://www.cahe.nmsu.edu/pubs/_e/E-215.pdf

great web site tells all you need for cooking on a mountain top!

Fonnell said...

Elevation: 4865 feet Rexburg Idaho